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How do we get such sunny YELLOW?

    From a plant called Pedro Pinto or ‪Achiote‬ which is a small tree also known as ‪Aploppas‬. Achiote dye is prepared by grinding seeds in water or oil. Achiote is such a safe ingredient that it is even used as a ‪natural‬ food colouring.     Commercially, annatto is used to add yellow color to chorizo, butter and margarine, cheese, and smoked fish. Achiote powder mixed with other spices and herbs can be turned into a paste to marinateand give a smoky flavor to meats, fish and poultry. A popular product made with ground achiote is sázon, available in small foil packets ready to use in your recipe. Most sázon brands contain MSG, but Badia does not. Refernece: Latinfood.about.com   Explore one...

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NATURAL FABRICS AN DYES- INSECTS

 The fabric is woven with 100% wool and dyed with natural dyes sourced from the earth. To create the vibrant colors for the bags, natural ingredients such as leaves, corn, flowers, sticks and seeds are hand-gathered to produce different hues for the dyes. Salt and lemon alter the shades of colors drastically. Even cochineal, a small beetle that lives on the local pear cactus, is crushed to create a red dye.  

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BRING THE BIGGEST SUITCASE YOU CAN FIND

Explore the Craft Towns of Ecuador ­ <img height="1" width="1" border="0" alt="" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1383023335301458&amp;ev=NoScript" /> <img height="1" width="1" style="display:none;" alt="" src="https://analytics.twitter.com/i/adsct?txn_id=l4rak&p_id=Twitter" />< img height="1" width="1" style="display:none;" alt="" src="//t.co/i/adsct?txn_id=l4rak&p_id=Twitter" /> If you’re planning a trip to Ecuador, my advice is simple: Bring the biggest suitcase you can find…two if your airline will allow it. Get on the Andean Craft Trail in the Sierra region along the Avenue of the Volcanoes that cuts north to south through Ecuador. It is full of artisan treasures that you won’t be able to resist.  We have a large collection of handmade items. Your support and purchase helps preserve the Inca tradition.  

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CHOSEN AND DEVOTED WOMEN OF THE INCAS

 There were called the AKLLAKUNA- Girls were considered to come of age at 14, at which age some were sent to Cuzco for special training to become akllakuna. These were women who devoted their lives to spinning and weaving for the sun and the Inca state. The akllakuna were the only girls who received formal education, they would be taught religious studies as well as weaving. As well as weaving ritual garments, their duties would include serving ritual food for the gods. Photo by inca Mario Testino shoot

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Taught from generation to generation uninterruptedly for two thousand years.

Myth has it that Our Mother Moon, taught the first woman how to weave at the beginning of time. Since then, mothers have taught their daughters, from generation to generation uninterruptedly for two thousand years. In addition to its important religious and social aspects, historically weaving has been central to indigenous women’s economic contribution to their households. In a traditional Inca context, when a girl is born, the midwife presents her with the different instruments of weaving one by one and she says, “Well then, little girl” “This will be your hand” “This will be your foot” “Here is your work” “With this, you’ll look for your food” “Don’t take the evil path,” “Don’t steal” “When you grow up” “Only...

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